Posts filed under ‘General’

New resource: Measuring Narrative Change

ORSImpact have produced an in-depth guide on measuring narrative change. The resource will be useful in communication and advocacy evaluation where we are often endeavouring to track and measure changes to the narratives of the pertinent issues. View the guide here>>

7102019_41124_521_Measuring_Narrative_Change_07_2019_Cover_thumbnail

May 28, 2020 at 1:06 pm Leave a comment

Measuring people power

MobLab has carried out a global study on how to measure people power – mobilising publics for campaigns and other initiatives. Here is an extract of the key takeawaysmpp-world-1:

key takeaways

For changemakers, if you’re not already measuring depth of supporter relationships and engagement (vs total numbers, or breadth), this report highlights a few ways to get started. Whether in a grassroots group, social movement, or an established NGO, tracking how committed people are to your mission (and to one another) and facilitating deeper relationships can be a big step forward.

For organisational leaders, this report is an urgent call to support cultures that are curious, innovative, and supporter- or people-centred. The results also clarified the importance of investing in staff and resources needed to build relationships with volunteers, grassroots, and community groups. The majority of the surveyed individuals found the very effort of measuring people power shifted and informed both tactics and strategy, guided day-to-day decision making, and was used to evaluate the past; essentially, to show them what was working and what wasn’t.

For funders, the results underscore the need to support organisations, groups and movements by investing in organising and power building, which don’t come with the same attractive metrics that we typically see in fundraising and digital advocacy. Funders should support both the implementation of sustained organising and supporter relationship building (outside of short term programme objectives) and ongoing development and experimentation in power building or “depth” metrics.”

View the report summary>>

May 14, 2020 at 12:54 pm Leave a comment

CART principles for monitoring

Innovations for Poverty Action have developed some useful guidance on activity monitoring and evaluation based on their own CART principles: credible, actionable, responsible, and transportable (see summary graphic below).

Particularly useful for those interested in monitoring which is an issue many organisations find challenging. Read more here>>

CART-Principles-Diagram

May 7, 2020 at 12:36 pm Leave a comment

Evaluation during COVID19 – infographic

Here an informative infographic from UNDP independent evaluation office on evaluation during COVID19 (view the pdf version here).
Eval_COVID19

 

 

April 30, 2020 at 11:07 am 1 comment

Evaluation and COVID19

There have been many useful and interesting articles on how evaluation can adapt and cope with the current COVID19 pandemic. Here is a collection of what I’ve found to date:

Practical tools/advice:
Conducting phone-based surveys during COVID 2019

A quick primer on running online events and meetings

Covid-19 crisis: how to adapt your data collection for monitoring and accountability

Think pieces:

Zenda Ofir: Evaluation in times of COVID19 outbreak

World Bank: Conducting evaluations in times of COVID-19

Chris Lysy: The Evaluation Mindset: Evaluation in a Crisis

M Q Patton: Evaluation Implications of the Coronavirus Global Health Pandemic Emergency
covid-19_

April 23, 2020 at 10:55 am 1 comment

Humanitarian advocacy – an introduction

For those interested in the area of humanitarian work and advocacy, this presentation could be of interest – where I explain what is humanitarian advocacy – its definition, levels, process and challenges.

Originally presented at CERAH as part of their Masters in Humanitarian Action. 

December 13, 2018 at 5:38 am Leave a comment

Example: mixed methods in evaluation

We often talk about using mixed methods in evaluation but we rarely see examples that go beyond a combination of surveys and interviews. So I wanted to share an example of an evaluation that I thought was a good example of using a variety of methods.  I was part of a team (of the Independent Evaluation Office) that carried out an evaluation of knowledge management at the Global Environment Facility.

The methods we used included:
-Semi-structured interviews
-Online surveys
-Comparative study of four organisations
-Meta-analysis of country-level evaluations
-Citation analysis – qualitative and quantitative
citation_analysis_small
The image shows the visualisation of the citation analysis (carried out by Matteo Borzoni) by theme – interesting stuff! I feel that the range of data collected gave us a very solid evidence base for the findings.  The report is available publicly and can be viewed here (pdf)>>

November 1, 2018 at 9:23 am Leave a comment

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