How Awareness Campaigns Fail

A very interesting article from the The Stanford Social Innovation Review : “Stop Raising Awareness Already”.

The article critiques a number of awareness campaigns and how they do not achieve what they set out to do – and in some cases may even do harm.

One campaign they look at is the “Dumb way to die” campaign focused on reducing the number of rail accidents in Victoria, Australia.  This campaign was much appreciated for its quirky video and song:

 

 

However, the campaign failed to address the main cause of railway accidents – the majority were suicides.  And as the article states:

“It is worth considering that the video’s charming figures and catchy hook may have actually made death seem more appealing or normal to those already at risk.”

But it’s not all criticism! The article provides some lessons for campaigners:

  • Target your audience as narrowly as possible;
  • Create compelling messages with clear calls to action;
  • Develop a theory of change;
  • Use the right messenger.

View the article here>>

 

 

April 11, 2017 at 7:54 am Leave a comment

Webinar: Responding to slow-onset crises

For those interesting in emergency response, research and crises, please join me for this webinar on a recent report I co-authored:

Webinar: Responding to slow-onset crises

Organisation: CHS Alliance
Location:
Date: 28 March 2017
Time: 9am to 10am UK time

Humanitarian agencies are increasingly responding to slow-onset crises despite facing many challenges according to a newly released report on surge practices for slow-onset crises. Join us for a webinar from the Transforming Surge Capacity Project where one of the report’s authors, Glenn O’Neil will present the key findings of the report and its recommendations for changing surge practices and policies to tackle slow-onset crises.

The webinar will be held on Tuesday 28th March at 9:00-10:00 UK time and can be accessed via the following Zoom link https://zoom.us/j/603361958. Please email qadeer.abdilleh@actionaid.org to confirm your attendance.

March 24, 2017 at 1:27 pm Leave a comment

Resource: Evaluating Policy Influence and Advocacy

Better Evaluation logo

The website Better Evaluation has many great resources and explanations of evaluation approaches, processes and methods.

I just came across this page on Evaluating Policy Influence and Advocacy that details well the methods and types of advocacy/policy influence – well worth a read!

March 7, 2017 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

Top 10 PR Research Insights of 2016

The US-based Institute for PR has just published their 10 insights from public relations and communications research of 2016. They scanned all major research studies and selected 10 trends; see the infographic below and read the full report here (pdf). My favourites are:

No.  3  – Most companies find it difficult to efficiently utilize available data and analytics
No. 8  – Many PR practitioners fail to execute the theory of two-way communications

top10 PR insights 2016

 

 

March 1, 2017 at 8:27 am Leave a comment

Participatory tools for M&E

ActionAid has just released an online toolbox and platform focused on participatory tools and processes for monitoring and evaluation.

Check out the Tools page that features some 80 participatory tools.

Here is a description of the toolbox from ActionAid:

The Reflection-Action Toolbox is an online platform which enable people to connect around how participatory tools and processes are used in practice. The aim is to create a global community of practice and provide an opportunity for M&E practitioners to access range of participatory tools, promote shared learning about added value of these tools, challenges faced, adaptations and innovations made in different contextual realities where applied.

Image from the Power Flower tool!

February 9, 2017 at 5:15 pm Leave a comment

Use of evaluation findings; types and influences

This month I gave presentation on “evaluation findings – types and influences” at the Swiss national health promotion conference. Some of the key points I raised were:

  1. Use may not be instrumental and direct as expected
  2. Stakeholder involvement is critical to use
  3. Organisations can influence evaluation use
  4. Use can be unpredictable, opportunistic & unexpected

Curious? View my slides below!

January 31, 2017 at 1:51 pm Leave a comment

New e-learning course: cutting edge M&E

A new e-learning course is available from TRAASS international ; Cutting-Edge M&E: A Guide for Practitioners. The course is taught by Colin Jacobs, a senior trainer with more than 25 years’ experience in international development. Colin’s recent roles include President at the UK Evaluation Society and Head, Governance and Civil Society at British Council.

This online course lays the ground for Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) to make vital contributions to incentivising change and measure performance. The course considers challenges in current M&E practice, introduces a tool-box of evaluation techniques and shows where these can be best applied. Ways of promoting early participation and the engagement of key stakeholders are explored and a step-by-step action plan to improve practice of M&E is provided. Further information>>

Full disclosure; I also present an e-learning course for TRAASS International; Effective and creative evaluation report writing.

January 24, 2017 at 10:30 am Leave a comment

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