New insights on design and evaluation

designI recently attended the International Evaluation Conference of the Australasian Evaluation Society in September 2017 and one of the more interesting sessions I attended was on design and evaluation. This was all about the notion of the design phase of a project or service and how evaluators can be well placed to contribute to this phase. You can learn more in this post by Matt Healey, a speaker at this session.


October 3, 2017 at 8:23 am Leave a comment

New ILO guidelines for evaluation

wcms_571338 The International Labour Office (ILO) has released their new guidelines for evaluation (pdf). Although the guidelines are specific to the ILO, the guidelines contain many useful chapters for evaluators and evaluation commissioners in general, for example on the steps for planning and managing and evaluation and communicating the results. View the guidelines here (pdf)>> 

September 26, 2017 at 7:59 am Leave a comment

Spotting dubious data

ACAPS has produced a great poster on “Spotting Dubious Data”. They make reference to humanitarian action but it applies across all sectors.  Below is a simplified version of the poster.

I think particularly point 1. is often ignored when looking at data – WHY was this data collected…

View the complete poster>>



August 23, 2017 at 9:13 am Leave a comment

New resources: measuring power shifts in favour of women

Evaluating shifts in power in society is very tricky to measure. ActionAid has just released a very comprehensive methodology pack on measuring power shifts in favour of women. Developed with Leitmotiv, it’s based on experiences in  Cambodia, Rwanda and Guatemala. View the resources>>

August 14, 2017 at 9:39 am 1 comment

Technology and evaluation conference 2017

MERL TECH graphic

If you are interested in technology, monitoring and evaluation, then consider the MERL Tech DC 2017 conference, Thursday – Friday, September 7th-8th 2017, Washington DC, US. Some really interesting presentations and workshops.

August 11, 2017 at 6:33 pm 1 comment

Say No to AVEs as a communications measure

A new campaign has been launched by the International Association for Measurement and Evaluation of Communication – AMEC to stamp out the use of AVEs – “Ad Value Equivalents” as a measure of communication and PR success. If you don’t know what an AVE is, it is basically where you look at how much coverage you have received in the news media (usually print) and then you estimate how much this coverage would have cost if you paid for it as advertising.

I think it’s a useless measure, as if we look at where “coverage” is happening today, it is a lot more fragmented than in just mainstream print media – and you can’t compare paid advertising with coverage. But still it persists. I recently saw a media monitoring dashboard of a major monitoring company that had AVE as a measure it offers its clients – that’s too bad. In the past 30 years of working in communications and evaluation I’ve never felt the need to use AVEs – there are so many more meaningful measures we can look at.   Read more from the academics and industry as to why we need to say No to AVEs.






July 6, 2017 at 7:24 am Leave a comment

Top metrics for social media

social-media-metrics-that-matter-v2-01Like many, you may be confused as to what you should measure on the social media platforms you are using for your communications.

Well, Katie Delahaye Paine, aka  The Measurement Queen, has offered her valuable advice on the top five social media metrics you should be measuring:

  1. Net increase in share of desirable conversation
  2. Top five performing pieces of content, measured by conversion
  3. Percentage increase in conversions
  4. Net growth in high­ quality engagement
  5. Cost­-effectiveness comparison

I really like the focus on engagement; read more here (pdf) where Katie explains each metric for you.

June 8, 2017 at 3:24 pm Leave a comment

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